If My Lips Could Build a Castle
Why, hello there.

I'm Elizabeth. I'm just a nerdy Catholic girl who likes to blog about things and to see you beautiful people. So, come along Pond. The game is afoot!

Enjoy Joo Won and HIS SEXY WINK


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hermionejg:

Kesha Rose in Elle UK

hermionejg:

Kesha Rose in Elle UK

1 day ago on August 20th, 2014 | J | 228 notes

mileysblackfriend:

dont-turn-up-the-light:

Ladies and Gentlemen, may I present the new Peter Pan and Wendy of the new movie, currently being filmed, Pan (2015).

Levi Miller and Leni Zieglmeier

(due for release 17th of July, 1015)

*pauses mid-celebration bc of the backlash i know this little girl is going to get for obtaining this role*

1 day ago on August 20th, 2014 | J | 58,397 notes
For many of these women, the reading experience begins from a place of seething rage. Take Sara Marcus’ initial impression of Jack Kerouac: “I remember putting On the Road down the first time a woman was mentioned. I was just like: ‘Fuck. You.’ I was probably 15 or 16. And over the coming years I realized that it was this canonical work, so I tried to return to it, but every time I was just like, ‘Fuck you.’” Tortorici had a similarly visceral reaction to Charles Bukowski: “I will never forget reading Bukowski’s Post Office and feeling so horrible, the way that the narrator describes the thickness of ugly women’s legs. I think it was the first time I felt like a book that I was trying to identify with rejected me. Though I did absorb it, and of course it made me hate my body or whatever.” Emily Witt turned to masculine texts to access a sexual language that was absent from books about women, but found herself turned off by their take: “many of the great classic coming-of-age novels about the female experience don’t openly discuss sex,” she says in No Regrets. “I read the ones by men instead, until I was like, ‘I cannot read another passage about masturbation. I can’t. It was like a pile of Kleenex.”

This isn’t just about the books. When young women read the hyper-masculine literary canon—what Emily Gould calls the “midcentury misogynists,” staffed with the likes of Roth, Mailer, and Miller—their discomfort is punctuated by the knowledge that their male peers are reading these books, identifying with them, and acting out their perspectives and narratives. These writers are celebrated by the society that we live in, even the one who stabbed his wife. In No Regrets, Elif Bautman talks about reading Henry Miller for the first time because she had a “serious crush” on a guy who said his were “the best books ever,” and that guy’s real-life recommendation exacerbated her distaste for the fictional. When she read Miller, “I felt so alienated by the books, and then thinking about this guy, and it was so hot and summertime … I just wanted to kill myself. … He compared women to soup.”

In No Regrets, women writers talk about what it was like to read literature’s “midcentury misogynists.” (via becauseiamawoman)

Here’s a fun thing you learn when you study literature: the western canon is not universally beloved. Those books are not the Truth any more than the New York Post is skilled journalism. The main reason they’re held in such high esteem is because they were written by boring white dudes with rage fantasies and boring white dudes with rage fantasies also happen to be largely in charge of deciding which books are deemed classics and taught forever in the American school system.
So if your boyfriend tells you he loves Kerouac then you tell your boyfriend Kerouac was a fucking second rate hack who wrote Beat style because he didn’t have the skill or talent to write any other way, which is probably also why he just copied every adolescent male wanderlust story since the beginning of time. That shit’s derivative and boring.

(via saintthecla)

1 day ago on August 20th, 2014 | J | 13,121 notes
wintergrey:

Reminder that Ferguson is a food desert and school is canceled. People’s movement is restricted. The work of the St Louis Food Bank is vital right now. Help if you can. (x)
STL FOOD BANK

wintergrey:

Reminder that Ferguson is a food desert and school is canceled. People’s movement is restricted. The work of the St Louis Food Bank is vital right now. Help if you can. (x)

STL FOOD BANK

1 day ago on August 19th, 2014 | J | 16,279 notes

postcardsfromspace:

According to a Pew Research survey, only 37% of white Americans think the events in #Ferguson raise important issues about race.

Okay, fellow white people. We need to talk.

Let me tell you a story: I was an angry punk teenager. Not violent, but I did a shitton of…

1 day ago on August 19th, 2014 | J | 21,660 notes

sylvie-divine:

Best political cartoons.

1 day ago on August 19th, 2014 | J | 45,224 notes

magnus-thegreat-redundancy:

I believe that every american should at least watch this monologue from The Newsroom

1 day ago on August 19th, 2014 | J | 435,421 notes

indieannajones:

Seriously, what the police are doing is not “bad”, it’s illegal.

There is a reason why people are raging mad at this situation, and it’s because it’s a blatant violation of basic human rights.

If you don’t understand that, then you are part of the problem.

1 day ago on August 19th, 2014 | J | 50,335 notes

blastortoise:

okay but when you have holocaust survivors and people who were activists during the civil rights movement supporting mike brown and then KKK members and neo nazi’s supporting the officer you should be able to figure out which side is the right one.

1 day ago on August 19th, 2014 | J | 127,771 notes

Let America be America again.
Let it be the dream it used to be.
Let it be the pioneer on the plain
Seeking a home where he himself is free.

(America never was America to me.)

Let America be the dream the dreamers dreamed—
Let it be that great strong land of love
Where never kings connive nor tyrants scheme
That any man be crushed by one above.

(It never was America to me.)

O, let my land be a land where Liberty
Is crowned with no false patriotic wreath,
But opportunity is real, and life is free,
Equality is in the air we breathe.

(There’s never been equality for me,
Nor freedom in this “homeland of the free.”)

Say, who are you that mumbles in the dark?
And who are you that draws your veil across the stars?

I am the poor white, fooled and pushed apart,
I am the Negro bearing slavery’s scars.
I am the red man driven from the land,
I am the immigrant clutching the hope I seek—
And finding only the same old stupid plan
Of dog eat dog, of mighty crush the weak.

I am the young man, full of strength and hope,
Tangled in that ancient endless chain
Of profit, power, gain, of grab the land!
Of grab the gold! Of grab the ways of satisfying need!
Of work the men! Of take the pay!
Of owning everything for one’s own greed!

I am the farmer, bondsman to the soil.
I am the worker sold to the machine.
I am the Negro, servant to you all.
I am the people, humble, hungry, mean—
Hungry yet today despite the dream.
Beaten yet today—O, Pioneers!
I am the man who never got ahead,
The poorest worker bartered through the years.

Yet I’m the one who dreamt our basic dream
In the Old World while still a serf of kings,
Who dreamt a dream so strong, so brave, so true,
That even yet its mighty daring sings
In every brick and stone, in every furrow turned
That’s made America the land it has become.
O, I’m the man who sailed those early seas
In search of what I meant to be my home—
For I’m the one who left dark Ireland’s shore,
And Poland’s plain, and England’s grassy lea,
And torn from Black Africa’s strand I came
To build a “homeland of the free.”

The free?

Who said the free? Not me?
Surely not me? The millions on relief today?
The millions shot down when we strike?
The millions who have nothing for our pay?
For all the dreams we’ve dreamed
And all the songs we’ve sung
And all the hopes we’ve held
And all the flags we’ve hung,
The millions who have nothing for our pay—
Except the dream that’s almost dead today.

O, let America be America again—
The land that never has been yet—
And yet must be—the land where every man is free.
The land that’s mine—the poor man’s, Indian’s, Negro’s, ME—
Who made America,
Whose sweat and blood, whose faith and pain,
Whose hand at the foundry, whose plow in the rain,
Must bring back our mighty dream again.

Sure, call me any ugly name you choose—
The steel of freedom does not stain.
From those who live like leeches on the people’s lives,
We must take back our land again,
America!

O, yes,
I say it plain,
America never was America to me,
And yet I swear this oath—
America will be!

Out of the rack and ruin of our gangster death,
The rape and rot of graft, and stealth, and lies,
We, the people, must redeem
The land, the mines, the plants, the rivers.
The mountains and the endless plain—
All, all the stretch of these great green states—
And make America again!

Let America Be America Again
Langston Hughes, 1935 (via kody)
1 day ago on August 19th, 2014 | J | 192 notes

itookyourboyfriendsvirginity:

i mean like i just don’t even know what to do about ferguson but it just like thinking about it gets me so blindingly angry and i wish there was something i could do than sit around and fucking blog about it. 

1 day ago on August 19th, 2014 | J | 3 notes
Tagged as: #preach 
kingjaffejoffer:

Right now in Ferguson
Curfew isn’t for 2 and a half more hours

kingjaffejoffer:

Right now in Ferguson

Curfew isn’t for 2 and a half more hours

1 day ago on August 19th, 2014 | J | 29,691 notes

nuanced-subversion:

is this beautiful solidarity too much for you, anon?

(also, i feel bad for you.)

1 day ago on August 19th, 2014 | J | 81,480 notes
64,000
That’s how many black women are currently missing in America — but the media doesn’t seem to care (via micdotcom)
1 day ago on August 19th, 2014 | J | 27,522 notes

brave-fart:

brave-fart:

brave-fart:

brave-fart:

brave-fart:

brave-fart:

brave-fart:

brave-fart:

did you hear about the italian chef who died?

he pasta way

he just ran out of thyme

here today, gone tomato

his wife is still upset, cheese still not over it

we never sausage a tragedy coming

ashes to ashes, crust to crust

there’s just not mushroom for italian chefs in today’s world

1 day ago on August 19th, 2014 | J | 226,510 notes